About FIRST

 

                FIRST, standing for “For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology,” is a non-profit organization that seeks to boost interest in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics) and develops young people into leaders of those fields. Founded in 1989, FIRST has created many team-structured opportunities to help accomplish their goals, such as FLL (FIRST Lego League), FTC (FIRST Tech Challenge), and FRC (FIRST Robotics Competition).
                The FIRST Robotics Competition is an international varsity sport of the mind designed to help high-school-aged young people discover how interesting and rewarding the life of engineers and researchers can be. The FIRST Robotics Competition tests the ability of teams and their mentors to complete a challenge in a six-week time frame using a common set of rules. Teams build robots from industrial-grade parts and enter them in competitions designed by Dean Kamen, Dr. Woodie Flowers, and a committee of engineers and other professionals.
                FIRST redefines winning for these students because they are rewarded for more than just their robot’s ability to win. Not only are teams recognized for excellence and creativity in robot design, but they must also demonstrate team spirit, involvement in their communities, gracious professionalism, maturity, and the ability to overcome obstacles. Scoring the most points is a secondary goal. Winning means building skills and partnerships that last.
                To access the FIRST website, click the link below:
https://www.firstinspires.org/
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A careful inspection by Kevin (and Kristen).
Recently, Brandeis University’s Center for Youth and Communities conducted an independent, retrospective survey of FIRST Robotics Competition participants and compared results to a group of non-FIRST students with similar backgrounds and academic experiences, including math and science. Highlights of the study’s findings include: When compared with the comparison group, FIRST students are:
  • Significantly more likely to attend college on a full-time basis than comparison students (88% vs. 53%)
  • More than 3 times as likely to major specifically in engineering.
  • Roughly 10 times as likely to have had an apprenticeship, internship, or co-op job in their freshman year.
  • Significantly more likely to expect to achieve a postgraduate degree.
  • More than twice as likely to expect to pursue a career in science and technology.
  • Nearly 4 times as likely to expect to pursue a career specifically in engineering.
  • More than twice as likely to volunteer in their communities.

You can see the whole survey here.

 

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